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The members of the Finnish Heritage Museum wore their aprons to celebrate "National Wear Your Apron Day" which is the Monday after Mother's Day, It also coincided with our regular monthly meeting on May 14, 2012. Thus our membership was certainly colorful and none of them worried about spills.

An apron, or "esiliina" is a garment that brings warm memories and recollections of a great person in your life. Even though an apron is a protective "uniform" known throughout the world to shield the wearer from whatever catastrophe may unfold, it is more than just protection. Many folks of both sexes wear them in their daily lives, mostly while doing their jobs. This includes mothers, day care workers, bakers, cooks, waitresses, nurses, steelworkers, millwrights, and so on.Ailiin2

Here, Ailiin Andrews, Rich Ohler, and Janine LaBounty display their aprons.

The word apron itself comes from the French word, "naperon" which evolved to apron. The Finnish language does its typically clean job of describing the garment with the esiliina name, since it signifies a linen or cloth worn in front.

 

Aprons basically fit into three styles: a pinafore, which is a full frontal apron with two holes for the arms and is tied in the back; a cobbler apron, which covers the front and back of the wearer and is usually part of a particular vocation's attire; and a bungalow apron, which is a full front and back article with arm holes and tied in the back. This last version eventually evolved into the patio dress or the house dress.

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On the right, Anne Kalliomaa Pohto, Nadine Visti, and Sue Troutman are happy with their aprons.

This writer remembers my Aiti (mother) wearing a half apron which only covered her front from the waist down to her knees. She wore it while making that wonderful nisu (cardamom flavored coffee bread). Many of FHM's membership recall their Mummas or Mummus (grandmothers) or Aitis wearing their aprons on a daily basis. Some of our members wear aprons yet today. It certainly is not an article of clothing which will go out of style or out of use.

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Dick Lehtinen, Bev Harbor, and Jim Harbor, show off some fancy aprons.

 

 

 

Pictured below and to the right are Elaine Kangas, Sharon Mackey, and Linda McAdams sporting their aprons.

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John Vrabel was not to be denied either,

wearing a sporty, red apron with reindeer.

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Below, Leena Maki wears a bold

red-orange design.

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On the left, Laura Malkamaki wears a

"very Finnish" esiliina in a colorful red

and white stripe.

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Below next right, Sandy Mischo

and Diane Torko with their aprons.

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Sue Troutman (L) and Milly Laituri are

enjoying something more than their

aprons, wearing smiles, (below, left).

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And finally, below, right,

Milly Laituri, Elaine Lillback and Virpi Buck

wear their aprons with smiles too.

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Pictures copyright FHM and Jeff Troutman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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